European Shirting Fabrics

 European Fabrics

In This Blog:

  • Italian chambray shirting – Cutting and sewing info.
  • Italian shirting fabrics – Introducing our range, cutting and sewing info.
  • Chino trousering –  Chino fabrics from Germany, cutting and sewing info.
  • Cotton shirting – Caring and washing cotton shirting.
  • Pattern showcase.

 

 European Shirting Fabrics from Croft Mill Fabrics online shop!

 Chambray Shirting fabrics

Quality Italian chambray shirting fabric woven on some of the best looms money can buy and a great cloth to wear.

A light to mid-weight, a plain-weave shirting fabric whose warp and weft threads are different colours, one of these generally white. Generally, chambray shirting is made out of cotton, but it can also be linen and, increasingly, incorporate synthetic fibres. It has a closely woven, firm surface with a slight glossiness. It resembles a lighter form of denim. Chambray shirting is rugged but light, making it suitable for work wear as well as summer-weight shirts and skirts.

Cutting out: use a regular layout, can be pinned.

Seams: plain, neatened with an overlocker or zigzag stitch

Thread: polyester all-purpose thread

Needle: machine size 70/11; or universal 80/12. Sharp needle for hand sewing.

Pressing: steam iron on a cotton setting; a pressing cloth is not required

Use for: blouses, men’s shirts, and children’s clothing.

 

Italian Cotton Shirting.

Croft Mill has a good range of beautiful cotton  Italian shirting. A good shirt fabric should always be washed in order to properly shrink it before making shirts. Otherwise, your shirt will be smaller after a while, and the stitching might look awful because the thread will not shrink to the same degree as the fabric.

A closely woven, fine cotton shirting, with coloured warp and weft yarns making stripes or checks.

Cutting out: use a nap layout if the fabric has uneven stripes

Seams: plain, neatened with an overlocker or zigzag stitch; a run and fell seam can also be used

Thread: polyester all-purpose thread

Needle: machine size 80/12; milliner’s for hand sewing

Pressing: steam iron on a cotton setting; a pressing cloth is not required

Use for: ladies’ and men’s shirts

Chino Fabric for Trousering.

Chino cloth is a twill fabric, originally made of 100% cotton. The most common items made from it, trousers, are widely called chinos. Today it is also found in cotton-synthetic blends. Chino fabric can be recognised by the subtle sheen it has. It is very hard-wearing and was traditionally used for uniforms or work wear. It is now more commonly used for casual clothing.

 

 

Cutting out: use a regular layout

Seams: plain, stitched using a walking foot and neatened with an overlocker or zigzag stitch

Thread: polyester all-purpose thread

Needle: universal size 80/12;  milliner’s for hand sewing

Pressing: steam iron on a cotton setting; use a seam roll under the seams with a pressing cloth

Use for: pants, skirts, men’s wear.

Cotton Shirting:

Cotton shirting is a worldwide favourite for comfortable, versatile clothing. A natural fibre, cotton can be found in garments as casual as a T-shirt or as elaborate as a ball gown.

Cotton fibres will shrink unless the fabric has been pre-shrunk or washed before you make your garment. Not pre-washing fabric may result in ankle-length cotton trousers becoming capri pants.

Cotton items that are pre-shrunk may be washed in hot, warm or cold water, depending on the colour of the garment and the care recommendations.

Cool-water washing will protect the deep colour of cotton jeans and preserve the pep of brightly coloured fabric.

Overdrying cotton will encourage shrinkage; dry cotton fabric at a lower heat. If tumbled dried, remove them from the dryer while still fairly cool.

A selection of patterns suitable to use with the fabrics discussed above.

If you enjoyed reading about these fabrics, please look at our blog on the ever popular Denim fabric.

All shirting and chino fabrics shown here are available from Croft Mill Fabrics. Our new Catalogue is now out View it online.

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